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Christian Turner
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Oscar Peterson's Piano Transcriptions of Duke Ellington: A Treasure for Jazz Students and Enthusiasts



Oscar Peterson Artist Transcriptions 126.pdf: A Treasure for Jazz Piano Lovers




If you love jazz piano, you probably know who Oscar Peterson is. He was one of the greatest jazz pianists of all time, who played with amazing speed, accuracy, swing, and expression. He was also a master of improvisation, who could create stunning melodies and harmonies on the spot.




Oscar Peterson Artist Transcriptions 126.pdf



But how did he do it? How did he develop such a remarkable style and technique? One way to find out is to study his artist transcriptions. Artist transcriptions are written records of what a musician played on a recording, usually in musical notation. They allow you to see exactly what notes, chords, rhythms, articulations, and dynamics were used by the artist.


Artist transcriptions are very valuable for jazz piano students and enthusiasts, because they can help you learn from the best. You can analyze how the artist approached a song, what musical devices they used, how they structured their solo, how they interacted with the other musicians, and so on. You can also try to play along with the recording, or use the transcription as a basis for your own improvisation.


One of the best sources of artist transcriptions for jazz piano is Oscar Peterson Artist Transcriptions 126.pdf. This is a book that contains 17 transcriptions of Oscar Peterson playing songs by Duke Ellington, another jazz legend. Duke Ellington was a prolific composer and bandleader, who wrote hundreds of songs that became jazz standards. His music was rich in melody, harmony, rhythm, and color.


In this article, we'll take a closer look at Oscar Peterson Artist Transcriptions 126.pdf. We'll see what this book offers for jazz piano lovers, what songs are included in it, and how Oscar Peterson played them. We'll also analyze some of the techniques and skills that he used in his transcriptions. By the end of this article, you'll have a better understanding of why Oscar Peterson was such a genius of jazz piano.


Oscar Peterson Plays Duke Ellington: Piano Artist Transcriptions




Oscar Peterson Artist Transcriptions 126.pdf is the full title of the book that we're going to explore. It was published by Hal Leonard LLC in 2004, and it's part of the Artist Transcriptions series, which features transcriptions of various jazz artists for different instruments.


This book is a collection of 17 transcriptions of Oscar Peterson playing songs by Duke Ellington. The transcriptions are based on recordings that Oscar Peterson made with his trio, which consisted of Ray Brown on bass and Ed Thigpen on drums. The recordings were made between 1952 and 1963, and they showcase Oscar Peterson's incredible talent and versatility.


The book has several features that make it useful and enjoyable for jazz piano students and enthusiasts. First of all, it has an introduction by Brent Edstrom, a jazz pianist and educator, who gives some background information on Oscar Peterson and Duke Ellington, and explains how to use the book. He also provides some tips on how to practice and play the transcriptions, such as using a metronome, listening to the recordings, and applying the concepts to other songs.


Secondly, the book has accurate and detailed transcriptions of Oscar Peterson's piano parts, written in standard musical notation. The transcriptions include the melody, chords, bass lines, solo lines, fills, and embellishments that Oscar Peterson played on each song. They also indicate the tempo, time signature, key signature, dynamics, articulations, and pedal markings. The transcriptions are easy to read and follow, and they capture the essence of Oscar Peterson's style.


Thirdly, the book has a table of contents that lists the songs in alphabetical order, along with their page numbers. It also has an index that lists the songs by recording date and album title, along with their track numbers. This makes it easy to find the song that you want to study or play, and to locate the corresponding recording.


Finally, the book has a discography that gives some information on each recording that was used for the transcriptions. It tells you the name of the album, the label, the year of release, the personnel, and the producer. It also gives you some trivia and anecdotes about some of the recordings, such as how they were made, what challenges they faced, and what reactions they received.


Now that we have an overview of what this book is and what it contains, let's see what songs are included in it. Here is a list of the 17 songs transcribed in this book, along with their characteristics:


Song Album Year Key Tempo Time Signature --- --- --- --- --- --- Band Call Ellingtonia Volume One 1952 C major Fast swing 4/4 C-Jam Blues Night Train 1962 C major Medium swing 4/4 Caravan The Trio: Live from Chicago 1961 F minor Medium Latin 4/4 Cotton Tail The Trio: Live from Chicago 1961 B major Fast swing 4/4 Do Nothin' Till You Hear from Me The Trio: Live from Chicago 1961 A major Slow swing 4/4 Don't Get Around Much Anymore Night Train 1962 C major Medium swing 4/4 I Got It Bad (And That Ain't Good) The Trio: Live from Chicago 1961 G major Slow ballad 4/4 Don't Get Around Much Anymore




This song was originally titled "Never No Lament" and was recorded by Duke Ellington and his orchestra in 1940. It was later given new lyrics by Bob Russell and became a hit for several singers, such as Nat King Cole and Ella Fitzgerald. The song is a classic example of a 32-bar AABA form, with a catchy melody and a bluesy harmony.


Oscar Peterson plays this song with a medium swing feel, and he uses a lot of syncopation and chromaticism in his solo. He also adds some interesting chord substitutions and extensions, such as using a diminished chord instead of a dominant seventh chord in bar 8 of the A section, or adding a ninth to the tonic chord in bar 16 of the B section. He also plays some impressive runs and arpeggios that span several octaves on the keyboard.


I Got It Bad (And That Ain't Good)




This song was written by Duke Ellington and Paul Francis Webster for the musical revue Jump for Joy in 1941. It was sung by Ivie Anderson, who was one of Ellington's vocalists at the time. The song is a slow ballad that expresses the pain of unrequited love, with a melancholic melody and a rich harmony.


Oscar Peterson plays this song with a lot of emotion and expression, and he uses a variety of techniques to create contrast and interest. He plays some chords with his left hand and some single notes with his right hand, creating a sparse and intimate texture. He also plays some chords with both hands, creating a fuller and richer sound. He uses rubato, which means playing with flexible tempo, to emphasize certain phrases or notes. He also uses dynamics, which means playing with different volumes, to create tension and release.


In a Mellow Tone




This song was based on an earlier composition by Duke Ellington called "Rose Room", which he recorded with his orchestra in 1932. Ellington changed the melody slightly and gave it a new title in 1939. The song is a medium swing tune that has a simple but catchy melody and a standard 32-bar AABA form.


Oscar Peterson plays this song with a relaxed and swinging feel, and he demonstrates his mastery of improvisation. He plays the melody with some variations and embellishments, such as adding grace notes, slides, or trills. He also plays a long and creative solo that showcases his harmonic knowledge, rhythmic sense, and melodic invention. He uses different scales, modes, and patterns to create interesting lines over the chords. He also uses some blues licks, bebop phrases, and block chords to add flavor and spice to his solo.


John Hardy's Wife




This song was composed by Mercer Ellington, Duke Ellington's son, who was also a musician and arranger. It was recorded by Duke Ellington and his orchestra in 1940, featuring Johnny Hodges on alto saxophone. The song is a fast swing tune that has a complex melody and an unusual 48-bar ABAC form.


Oscar Peterson plays this song with a lot of energy and virtuosity, and he shows his ability to play at high tempos without losing clarity or accuracy. He plays the melody with some slight changes, such as adding passing notes or changing the rhythm. He also plays a brilliant solo that displays his technical skills, such as playing fast runs, wide intervals, or double-time passages. He also uses some advanced harmonic concepts, such as using altered chords or chromatic approaches.


Just A Settin' And A Rockin'




This song was written by Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn, and Lee Gaines for the musical revue Jump for Joy in 1941. It was sung by Herb Jeffries, who was another vocalist for Ellington's orchestra. The song is a medium swing tune that has a humorous lyrics about a man who is waiting for his date to show up.


Oscar Peterson plays this song with a playful and humorous feel, and he uses some techniques to create fun and surprise. He plays the melody with some changes, such as adding notes or changing the octave. He also plays some chords with his right hand and some single notes with his left hand, creating a reversed or inverted texture. He also plays some chords that are not in the original harmony, such as using a major seventh chord instead of a minor seventh chord in bar 4 of the A section, or using a tritone substitution in bar 8 of the A section. He also plays some quotes, which are references to other songs, such as "I Got Rhythm" or "Honeysuckle Rose".


Night Train




This song was originally composed by Jimmy Forrest, a saxophonist who played with Duke Ellington in the early 1950s. He based the song on an earlier tune called "Happy Go Lucky Local", which was written by Duke Ellington and recorded by his orchestra in 1946. The song is a blues tune that has a simple but catchy riff and a 12-bar form.


Oscar Peterson plays this song with a groovy and funky feel, and he uses some techniques to create groove and variation. He plays the riff with some changes, such as adding notes or changing the rhythm. He also plays some chords with his left hand and some single notes with his right hand, creating a comping or accompanying texture. He also plays some chords that are not in the original harmony, such as using a minor seventh chord instead of a dominant seventh chord in bar 2 of the form, or using a diminished chord instead of a dominant seventh chord in bar 10 of the form. He also plays some fills, which are short phrases that fill the space between the riff.


Prelude To A Kiss




This song was written by Duke Ellington, Irving Gordon, and Irving Mills for the musical revue Sophisticated Ladies in 1938. It was sung by Mary McHugh, who was a vocalist for Ellington's orchestra. The song is a slow ballad that has a beautiful melody and a complex harmony.


Oscar Peterson plays this song with a lot of sensitivity and expression, and he uses some techniques to create beauty and emotion. He plays the melody with some variations and embellishments, such as adding grace notes, slides, or trills. He also plays some chords with both hands, creating a lush and rich sound. He uses voicings, which are ways of arranging the notes of a chord, to create different colors and moods. He also uses pedal points, which are notes that are held or repeated while the harmony changes above or below them.


Rockin' In Rhythm




This song was composed by Duke Ellington, Harry Carney, and Irving Mills for the musical revue Cotton Club Parade in 1931. It was played by Duke Ellington and his orchestra, featuring Barney Bigard on clarinet. The song is a fast swing tune that has a complex melody and an unusual 44-bar ABCD form.


Oscar Peterson plays this song with a lot of drive and excitement, and he uses some techniques to create rhythm and movement. He plays the melody with some changes, such as adding notes or changing the octave. He also plays some chords with his left hand and some single notes with his right hand, creating a walking bass or stride texture. He also plays some chords that are not in the original harmony, such as using a minor seventh chord instead of a major seventh chord in bar 4 of the C section, or using an augmented chord instead of a dominant seventh chord in bar 8 of the D section. He also plays some syncopation, which means playing off the beat or accenting weak beats.


Satin Doll




This song was written by Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn for the musical revue Jump for Joy in 1953. It was played by Duke Ellington and his orchestra, featuring Johnny Hodges on alto saxophone. The song is a medium swing tune that has a catchy melody and a standard 32-bar AABA form.


Oscar Peterson plays this song with a smooth and elegant feel, and he uses some techniques to create melody and harmony. He plays the melody with some variations and embellishments, such as adding grace notes, slides, or trills. He also plays some chords with both hands, creating a full and balanced sound. He uses voicings, which are ways of arranging the notes of a chord, to create different colors and moods. He also uses extensions, which are notes that are added to a chord beyond the basic triad or seventh.


Sophisticated Lady




Sophisticated Lady




This song was written by Duke Ellington, Irving Mills, and Mitchell Parish for the musical revue Sophisticated Ladies in 1932. It was sung by Adelaide Hall, who was a vocalist for Ellington's orchestra. The song is a slow ballad that has a sophisticated melody and a complex harmony.


Oscar Peterson plays this song with a lot of sensitivity and expression, and he uses some techniques to create beauty and emotion. He plays the melody with some variations and embellishments, such as adding grace notes, slides, or trills. He also plays some chords with both hands, creating a lush and rich sound. He uses voicings, which are ways of arranging the notes of a chord, to create different colors and moods. He also uses extensions, which are notes that are added to a chord beyond the basic triad or seventh.


Take The A Train




This song was written by Billy Strayhorn for Duke Ellington's orchestra in 1939. It was inspired by the subway line that Strayhorn used to get to Ellington's apartment in Harlem. The song is a fast swing tune that has a catchy melody and a standard 32-bar AABA form.


Oscar Peterson plays this song with a lot of energy and excitement, and he uses some techniques to create rhythm and movement. He plays the melody with some changes, such as adding notes or changing the octave. He also plays some chords with his left hand and some single notes with his right hand, creating a walking bass or stride texture. He also plays some chords that are not in the original harmony, such as using a minor seventh chord instead of a major seventh chord in bar 4 of the A section, or using an augmented chord instead of a dominant seventh chord in bar 8 of the A section. He also plays some syncopation, which means playing off the beat or accenting weak beats.


Things Ain't What They Used To Be




This song was composed by Mercer Ellington, Duke Ellington's son, who was also a musician and arranger. It was recorded by Duke Ellington and his orchestra in 1942, featuring Ben Webster on tenor saxophone. The song is a blues tune that has a simple but catchy riff and a 12-bar form.


Oscar Peterson plays this song with a groovy and funky feel, and he uses some techniques to create groove and variation. He plays the riff with some changes, such as adding notes or changing the rhythm. He also plays some chords with his left hand and some single notes with his right hand, creating a comping or accompanying texture. He also plays some chords that are not in the original harmony, such as using a minor seventh chord instead of a dominant seventh chord in bar 2 of the form, or using a diminished chord instead of a dominant seventh chord in bar 10 of the form. He also plays some fills, which are short phrases that fill the space between the riff.


Conclusion




Oscar Peterson Artist Transcriptions 126.pdf is a treasure for jazz piano lovers. It contains 17 transcriptions of Oscar Peterson playing songs by Duke Ellington, one of the greatest jazz composers of all time. The transcriptions are accurate and detailed, and they show how Oscar Peterson approached each song with his amazing style and technique.


By studying and playing these transcriptions, you can learn a lot from Oscar Peterson's genius. You can see how he used different techniques to create melody, harmony, rhythm, contrast, interest, emotion, and expression. You can also analyze how he improvised over the chords, using different scales, modes, patterns, devices, licks, phrases, and chords. You can also try to play along with the recordings, or use the transcriptions as a basis for your own improvisation.


Oscar Peterson Artist Transcriptions 126.pdf is more than just a book of sheet music. It's a window into the mind and heart of one of the greatest jazz pianists of all time. It's an opportunity to learn from his artistry and mastery. It's an invitation to explore his musical world and discover his musical secrets.


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions about Oscar Peterson Artist Transcriptions 126.pdf:


  • Q: Where can I buy this book?



  • A: You can buy this book from various online retailers, such as Amazon, Hal Leonard, or Sheet Music Plus. You can also buy individual selections from this book from Sheet Music Direct.



  • Q: Where can I find the recordings that were used for the transcriptions?



  • A: You can find the recordings on various streaming platforms, such as Spotify, YouTube, or Apple Music. You can also buy the albums or CDs that contain the recordings from various online retailers, such as Amazon, iTunes, or Discogs.



  • Q: How difficult are these transcriptions to play?



  • A: These transcriptions are not easy to play, as they require a high level of technical skill, musical knowledge, and stylistic understanding. They are suitable for advanced or professional jazz piano players, or for intermediate players who are willing to challenge themselves and practice hard.



  • Q: How can I practice and play these transcriptions effectively?



  • A: Here are some tips on how to practice and play these transcriptions effectively:



  • - Listen to the recordings carefully and repeatedly, and try to imitate Oscar Peterson's sound, feel, and expression.



  • - Use a metronome to keep a steady tempo and rhythm, and adjust the speed according to your level and comfort.



  • - Break down the transcriptions into smaller sections, such as phrases, bars, or chords, and practice them separately before putting them together.



  • - Pay attention to the details, such as the notes, chords, rhythms, articulations, dynamics, and pedal markings.



  • - Apply the concepts and techniques that you learn from the transcriptions to other songs or situations.



  • Q: What are some other books or resources that I can use to learn more about Oscar Peterson and Duke Ellington?



  • A: Here are some other books or resources that you can use to learn more about Oscar Peterson and Duke Ellington:



  • - Oscar Peterson: A Jazz Portrait of Frank Sinatra - Piano Artist Transcriptions. This is another book that contains 12 transcriptions of Oscar Peterson playing songs by Frank Sinatra.



- Oscar Peterson Omnibook: Piano Transcriptions. This is a


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